New Releases.

Wellness.

Brands.

Community.

FREE 10K TRAINING GUIDE

|

If you’ve just completed your first 5K or were feeling really good at your last 5K race, it might be time to start looking for an upcoming 10K race. Double the distance must mean double the fun, right? Ask any runner who has completed one, and the answer is always “YES!” After you’ve broken the barrier of nerves keeping you from going a little farther, you’ll start to wonder why it took you so long to start running 10K races. And just for this very reason, we have once again gathered our running Fit Experts and created an easy-to-follow 10K Running Training Guide for runners looking to tackle their first 10K race.

*This guide was created as an 8-week training plan for runners with some running experience, doing regular cardio activities like walking and jogging and/or have completed a 5K distance run.
**This plan was created for informational purposes and should not be constructed as individual training advice. Before starting any new exercise program, please consult a doctor or health care professional.

helpful tips

Let’s start with some facts that make this 10K Running Training Plan different from 5K training:

  • As always, training will vary from runner to runner, depending on your fitness level.
    • If you are still new to running, consider the training period to be about 10-12 weeks long for a 10K race.
    • If you are already a regular runner, you can consider a shorter plan of 6-8 weeks long for a 10K race.
  • We like to schedule 3-4 days of running workouts during training and add some cross-training in between to help strengthen or stretch other muscles of your body.
    • Consider which days work best for your schedule, but don’t schedule more than 2 “rest days” or “hard workout days” in a row. 
    • Make sure to give yourself at least one full rest day a week to allow your muscles and body to recover before the following workout.
  • Cross-training is way more critical when you start adding distance to your running.
    • “Cross-training” is any form of exercise that improves your aerobic fitness. For runners, it’s anything that’s not running, it could be things like Zumba classes, cycling, or jump roping. 
    • “Low-impact cross-training” is any exercise that gets your heart rate up slowly, is usually easier on your joints, and helps reduce soreness and risk of injury. Swimming, walking, pilates, or yoga are excellent low-impact cross-training and stretch exercises for runners between run sessions.
  • Start all workouts and races with a basic warm-up and finish with a brief cool-down.
    • Warm up on race day with a 1-1.5 mile very easy run right before start time to get you race ready.
    • Cool down post-race with a 0.5-mile easy jog and soft breathing to bring your heart rate back to normal.
  • In this 10K Running Training Guide, we give you both time and distance-based workouts each day to provide you with the convenience of choosing your preference. For this guide, we outlined each day with something specific for you to concentrate on:
    • Day 1: “Easy day”
      • Steady, easy effort should be your mentality today; you could chat with a friend while completing today’s miles.
    • Day 2: “Move how you want to day”
      • Do something to move your body, and get your heart rate up. We recommend a walk or run for the designated time or try a cross-training workout that sounds exciting.
    • Day 3: “Rest day”
      • No need to sweat today. Take a breather and let your muscles rest for the next workout.
    • Day 4: “Moderate day”
      • You should challenge yourself a little with your mileage or your time. Effort should be more than your day 1 run.
    • Day 5: “Easy Cross training” Or “Rest day”
      • Depending on how your body is feeling, either do a low-impact cross-train or take a rest day to prep your body for the next run. 
    • Day 6: “Hard day”
      • Today is your max effort day, with the longest mileage or time of your run training cycle.
    • Day 7: “Rest day”
      • No workout clothes are necessary today. You’ve earned a full-on rest day where your only plan should be doing a lot of nothing.

Fit Expert 10K Training Guide

Week 1 “Let’s do this
Day 1: 3 miles easy or 35-40 minutes easy run
Day 2: 20-30 minutes walk/run or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 3 miles easy or 35 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 3-3.5 miles easy 30-35 minutes easy run
Day 7: Rest Day


Week 2 “You ARE a Runner!”
Day 1: 3 miles easy run or 35-40 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 4 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 20-30 minutes run/walk or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 3.5 miles easy run or 35-40 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 4 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 4-mile run or 40-45 minute run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day


Week 3 “Feeling Good!”
Day 1: 3.5 miles easy run or 35-40 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 4 minutes then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 30-minute run/walk or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 4 miles run or 40-45 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 4 mile run or 40-45 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day

Week 4 “Halfway There!”
Day 1: 3 miles easy run or 30-35 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 4 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 30-minute run/walk or cross train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 4 miles run or 40-45 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 5 miles run or 50-55 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day

Week 5 “Building a run routine
Day 1: 4 miles easy run or 40-45 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 4 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 3 miles run or 30-minute run or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 3.5-4 miles run or 35-40 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 5 miles run or 50-55 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 7 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day

Week 6 “You’ve got this!
Day 1: 4 miles easy run or 40-45 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 3 miles run or 30-minute run or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 3.5-4 miles run or 35-40 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 5.5-6 miles run or 55-60 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 8 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day (light cross-train like yoga if needed to stretch)

Week 7 “Almost there!
Day 1: 3-3.5 miles easy run or 35-40 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 5 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: 20-30 minutes run/walk or cross-train
Day 3: Rest Day
Day 4: 4 miles run or 40-45 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low-intensity cross-train or rest if needed
Day 6: 4 miles run or 40-45 minutes run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 7: Rest Day

Week 8 “Race Week!
Day 1: 3-4 miles easy run or 30-40 minutes easy run
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 2: Rest Day
Day 3: 3 miles or 30 minutes run/walk
Day 4: 30-40 minutes low intensity cross-train
(Interval suggestion: run 6 minutes, then walk 1 minute)
Day 5: Low intensity cross train or Rest
Day 6: Rest Day
Day 7: Race Day!


**This plan was created for informational purposes and should not be constructed as individual training advice. Before starting any new exercise program, please consult a doctor or health care professional.

just get started

10K races are unique because they are a great “bite-sized challenge” for runners looking to add a tad more distance in their running journey forward. Taking the step from running a 5K to running a 10K can seem daunting at first, but there is nothing to be nervous about because the Fit2Run Fit Experts are always here to help and cheer you on! Our best piece of advice is, “Start by taking it one step at a time; trust that you have what it takes because you do.” And trust us, once you have completed your first 10K race, you’ll be hooked on running more distance and looking for the next challenge. Half-marathon anyone?

Share your 10K running training journey with us and tag us on social Fit2Run, The Runner’s Superstore so we can send you extra motivation or a virtual high five for a great run. And come chat with us at any Fit2Run store location for more running advice, gear, or information directly from our Fit Experts! 

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: